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Exotic Tribes
Be a responsible traveller. Show tribal people respect and meet them on their premises. Visiting people with a different lifestyle and culture could sometimes be a very rewarding adventure, but be aware of that many tribal communities are extremely vulnerable to outside influences. All tribal people need to be protected from tourists in order to preserve their unique lifestyle and cultures. Travellers should understand that some tribes would like to live undisturbed, and that visit would be an intrusion.

Mashco-Piro tribe make contact in Amazon, Peru

2013-08-23

Uploaded on YouTube 20th August 2013 by World Star Hip Hop News. This video clip shows a isolated tribe called Mashco-Piro in Amazon, Peru, making contact with outsiders for the second time.

Members of an Indian tribe that has long lived in voluntary isolation in Peru's southeastern Amazon have attempted to make contact with outsiders for a second time since 2011, leading to a tense standoff at a river hamlet.

Authorities are unsure what provoked the three-day encounter but say the Mashco-Piro may be upset by illegal logging in their territory as well as drug smugglers who pass through. Oil and gas exploration also affects the region.

The more than 100 members of Mashco-Piro clan appeared across the Las Piedras river from the remote community of Monte Salvado in the Tambopata region of Madre de Dios state from June 24-26, said Klaus Quicque, president of the regional FENAMAD indigenous federation.

They asked for bananas, rope and machetes from the local Yine people but were dissuaded from crossing the river by FENAMAD rangers posted at the settlement, said Mr Quicque, who directed them to a banana patch on their side of the river. For more information about this tribe and the video clip.

You can also read and watch more articles and video clips of exotic tribes on our global travel guide Travel Explorations.

Stein Morten Lund, 23th August 2013

 


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